My Hands Make Me Look 15 Years Older!

“The Fountain of Youth” – Dr Chris Porter’s inside view of cosmetic surgery where he aims to help you to make the best possible informed choice and achieve your cosmetic surgery goals.

The top of our hands are subjected to the same aging and sun damage as the skin on our faces. As we get older our hands may develop thin skin, wrinkles, patchy brown spots and lose the cushioning fat that softens the skin. Loss of this fatty layer makes the veins and tendons more obvious giving a skeletonised appearance.

Thankfully there are some relatively simple procedures that can make your hands appear more youthful.

Patchy pigmentation, fine wrinkles and thin skin can be treated by peels, either chemical or laser or IPL. Maintenance of this improvement requires regular use of sunscreen and vitamin A cream.

To conceal obvious veins and tendons the best procedure is structural fat grafting, this will re-fill the thin fatty layer and provide a softer appearance to the skin. It has been proven also that fat grafting can improve the skins color and texture. Structural fat grafting is performed by moving fat from another part of the body, such as the tummy or buttocks, and then transplanting them to the back of the hands. The fat is inserted by a series of small injections. Fat is a better option than synthetic fillers as fat will survive permanently whereas synthetic fillers will last  maximum of 12 months.

If you have any specific requests regarding cosmetic surgery topics that you would like discussed on this blog, please feel free to email me: chris@breast-body.co.nz

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Being Sun-Slack is a Significant Health Risk

“The Fountain of Youth” – Dr Chris Porter’s inside view of cosmetic surgery where he aims to help you to make the best possible informed choice and achieve your cosmetic surgery goals.

For this blog I am going to deviate away from cosmetic surgery to reinforce the link between skin cancer and sun exposure.

It is estimated that more than two million Americans are diagnosed with non-melanoma skin cancer every year. Melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer that can spread to other organs, strikes nearly 77,000 people and kills about 9,500 in the US every year. More than half of the cases of invasive melanoma are diagnosed in individuals between the ages of 45 and 64.

In the 40 years between 1970 and 2010, for European adults between the ages of 40 and 60, the incidence of skin cancer increased 4.5-fold among men and 24-fold among women.

So, what is behind the increased incidence in melanoma among middle-aged Americans? There has been a cultural trend in the USA, Europe and Australasia for many decades in which people connect being tan with being fit and even successful. This desire for tanning is the opposite of Asian, Hispanic and Middle Eastern cultures where a paler complexion is associated with affluence, as a result the combination of their naturally more pigmented skin and sun avoidance leads to significantly lower rates of skin cancer.

Sun exposure not only increases your risk of skin cancer it causes premature aging. Common facial skin changes include lines and creases, irregular pigmentation, ruddiness and thinning of the skin. My advice, if you want to look healthy then minimize your sun exposure, remember tanning is for leather!

If you have any specific requests regarding cosmetic surgery topics that you would like discussed on this blog, please feel free to email me: chris@breast-body.co.nz

Angelina Jolie’s Prophylactic Mastectomies

“The Fountain of Youth” – Dr Chris Porter’s inside view of cosmetic surgery where he aims to help you to make the best possible informed choice and achieve your cosmetic surgery goals.

Jolie penned in New York Times about her prophylactic double mastectomy: “My doctors estimated that I had an 87 percent risk of breast cancer and a 50 percent risk of ovarian cancer, although the risk is different in the case of each woman,” she wrote. “Once I knew that this was my reality, I decided to be proactive and to minimize the risk as much as I could. I made a decision to have a preventive double mastectomy.” Jolie has been praised in the media for having the courage to go through this procedure, and in addition being willing to share her story in order to encourage similar women with the BRCA gene to understand and manage their increased risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer.

Jolie understands cancer, her mother, actress Marcheline Bertrand, had breast cancer and died of ovarian cancer six years ago at the age of 56. Her grandmother died of ovarian cancer at age 45 and her Aunt just passed away from ovarian cancer at age 61.

Jolie reports that the procedure involved preservation of her nipples, removal of the breast gland and reconstruction of her breasts with implants. Like Jolie, everyday women who decide to undergo prophylactic mastectomies are likely to also be concerned about how they will look once the procedure is completed. A consultation with a plastic surgeon who specializes in breast reconstruction will provide information about options for reconstruction, whether the technique involves implants or the woman’s own tissue. Contemporary implants used in breast reconstruction are textured and anatomical (tear drop) shaped filled with cohesive silicone gel. By using this style of implant breast shape is optimised and longevity is maximized by the addition of Alloderm.

If you have any specific requests regarding cosmetic surgery topics that you would like discussed on this blog, please feel free to email me: chris@breast-body.co.nz

Scientific Proof – How Smoking Makes You Look Older

“The Fountain of Youth” – Dr Chris Porter’s inside view of cosmetic surgery where he aims to help you to make the best possible informed choice and achieve your cosmetic surgery goals.

In a recent Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery journal article titled “Facial Changes Caused by Smoking: A Comparison between Smoking & Nonsmoking Identical Twins” specific components of facial aging secondary to smoking were identified. This was performed by comparing standardized photographs of identical twins with different smoking histories. The following is a summary of the study.

During the Twins Days Festival in Twinsburg, Ohio, from 2007 to 2010, 79 pairs of twins were identified, in which only one twin smokes or where one twin smoked at least 5 years longer than his or her counterpart. Questionnaires were obtained and standardized photographs were taken by professional photographers. A panel of three blinded judges analyzed the twins’ facial features and graded wrinkles and ranked age-related facial features.

The results showed that smoking twins compared with their nonsmoking counterparts had aged more causing upper eyelids sagging, lower lid bags, malar bags, heavy cheek folds, upper and lower lip wrinkles, and jowls. Other less significant features found in smokers included lower lid hyper-pigmentation, transverse and vertical forehead wrinkles and crows feet.

In conclusion, this study details the specifics of facial aging brought on by smoking, which primarily affects the middle and lower thirds of the face. It also demonstrated that a 5-year difference in smoking history can cause noticeable differences in facial aging between twins.

My personal philosophy is to ask smoking patients to quit 3 weeks prior to surgery, for both surgical and anaesthetic reasons. It has already been well documented that smokers have up to a 4-5 times greater complication rate after surgery in regard to wound healing, scarring, infections as well as slower recovery in regard to breathing and return to normal functioning. This study adds the bonus that if you stop smoking you will will also look younger than if you keep smoking. Now is a good time to quit!

If you have any specific requests regarding cosmetic surgery topics that you would like discussed on this blog, please feel free to email me: chris@breast-body.co.nz